Saturday, November 16, 2019

Buying QSL cards from DX stations

I received the confirmation paper QSL cards from my WRTC 2018 contacts via bureau last week. Now I ask myself, was it necessary? Is it a waste of paper? Yes, I did the request for these QSLs myself and I regret. What am I doing with all this paper? I don't really collect paper QSL anymore. Paper QSL is a thing from the past. There are other ways to confirm a contact now. I already have these contacts confirmed by LOTW. Think of eQSL, LOTW and many others. There is no need for a paper QSL anymore except for those who collect them.

Well. collect them or buy them? There is another trend going on in QSL world. Many stations are not a member from any club or society anymore and QSL bureaus are receiving less QSL cards every year. Those who still want that paper QSL in the past were proud to send them, QSL bureau or not, since the receiver would have the same costs to send a QSL in return. But these days it looks like it is big business. Not for those that want QSL exchange only but also for the post providers. Postage is expensive and a excuse for not sending any QSL. I see a trend that DX stations especially, even if they are not really rare, ask several US dollars for postage. I fact you can pay by paypal and that way it is just a matter of buying your confirmation. Personally I don't like that, I might be old fashion. But this is still a hobby and if I would buy all the QSL I need for DXCC confirmation that would a considerable amount of money. There are other ways but I know several (DX) stations that don't confirm at any online QSL service so if you want to have your contact confirmed you have to pay them first. So unfortunate....

The final courtesy of a QSO is the QSL....

These days that would be:

The final courtesy of a QSO is the confirmation...

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Long time ago....

It has been a long time I wrote something on this QSL of Conduct site. It is also a long time ago amateurradio operators begun with the habit of exchanging QSL. This video shows how a vintage QSL is printed.


It remembers me of my 2 years graphic school years in the eighties. That's before I developed a interest in electronics. I've been working with a similair press and learned typesetting with my bare hands. I really can't remember much of that time but watching the video some of it came back in my mind. From a art point of view QSL cards can be a very valuable item to collect. Especially the antique ones. It's nice to see that they are still made...

Sunday, December 20, 2015

QSL via bureau returning

For a while now I asked myself how on earth I can get QSL returned via bureau. Most of the time I only answer bureau cards. It has been very rare I send my QSL card first. Unfortenately I dumped a lot of less interesting cards in the garbage (oh my!) So from the 3 cards at the right I could not find DF8JE. I found the QSL manager from A61BM is IZ8CLM, it is printed on the card so it is my own fault. I will send the A61BM card again. The last card is from Z60WW, their card does not have a TNX/PSE QSL sign printed on it. I guess it is my fault, I tried to return a card. However it reached me via the bureau so I presumed I could return a QSL via bureau. It did happen before but those cards are all gone in the garbage, I didn't investigate why they had been returned. I remember 2 times the operator was SK. But others could be send via a QSL system like GlobalQSL. If you receive those cards via bureau and the station is not participating the return QSL will get back to you. It is important that it is clear how to return a card, print it on your card near the PSE/TNX QSL sentence. Otherwise others presume they can return a QSL card via bureau.